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Kemba Credit Union will under no circumstances contact our members by phone, text or email asking them for personal information that could threaten their account information or their identity. Unless you have contacted us directly by phone or from our website, do not give out any personal or account information. Identity theft, phishing scams and financial fraud are extremely common today so pay attention to what you are opening and what information you are giving out.

Phishing Tips

Phishing

Phishing attacks use email or malicious websites (clicking on a link) to collect personal and financial information or infect your machine with malware and viruses.

Protect Yourself with these STOP. THINK. CONNECT. Tips:
  • When in doubt, throw it out: Links in email, tweets, posts and online advertising are often how cybercriminals try to compromise your information. If it looks suspicious, even if you know the source, it’s best to delete or, if appropriate, mark it as junk.
  • Think before you act: Be wary of communications that implores you to act immediately, offers something that sounds too good to be true or asks for personal information.
  • Make your password a sentence: A strong password is a sentence that is at least 12 characters long. Focus on positive sentences or phrases that you like to think about and are easy to remember (for example, “I love country music.”). On many sites, you can even use spaces!
  • Unique account, unique password:  Having separate passwords for every account helps to thwart cybercriminals. At a minimum, separate your work and personal accounts and make sure that your critical accounts have the strongest passwords. 
  • Lock down your login: Fortify your online accounts by enabling the strongest authentication tools available, such as biometrics, security keys or a unique one-time code through an app on your mobile device. Your usernames and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, banking and social media.
How Do You Avoid Being a Victim?
  • Don’t reveal personal or financial information in an email, and do not respond to email solicitations for this information. This includes following links sent in email.
  • Before sending sensitive information over the Internet, check the security of the website.
  • Pay attention to the website's URL. Malicious websites may look identical to a legitimate site, but the URL may use a variation in spelling or a different domain (e.g., .com versus .net).
  • If you are unsure whether an email request is legitimate, try to verify it by contacting the company directly. Contact the company using information provided on an account statement, not information provided in an email.
  • Keep a clean machine. Having the latest operating system, software, web browsers, anti-virus protection and apps are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats.

For more information on Phishing scams and other ways to stay safe online visit StaySafeOnline.org

Scams and Financial Fraud

Telephone Scams

Every year, thousands of people lose their money and personal information to telephone scams. Typically, phone scammers will try to sell you something you hadn't planned to buy and will pressure you to give up personal information, like your credit card details or Social Security number.

Common Phone Scams

In telemarketing fraud, phone scammers will often use exaggerated—or even fake—prizes, products, and services as bait. Some may call you, but others will use mail, text, or ads to get you to call them for more details. Types of phone scams include:

  • Travel packages - "Free" or "low-cost" vacations can end up costing a fortune in hidden costs. 
  • Credit and loans - Popular schemes include advance fee loans, payday loans, and credit card loss protection
  • Fake business and investment opportunities - As business and investing can be complicated, scammers take advantage of people not researching the investment. 
  • Charitable causes - Many phone scams involve urgent requests for recent disaster relief efforts.

National Do Not Call List

Avoid phone scams by registering your home and cell phone numbers with the National Do Not Call Registry or by calling 1-888-382-1222. This national registry was created to offer consumers a choice regarding telemarketing calls. Most legitimate companies don't call if your number is on the registry. If a company is ignoring the registry, there’s a good chance that it’s a scam. If you get these calls, hang up.

Report Telephone Fraud

If you believe you have been a victim of a telephone scam or telemarketing fraud, you can file an online complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), or by phone at 1-877-382-4357.

Financial Fraud

Scam artists use different types of fraud to try to trick people out of their money. Two common types of fraud are banking scams and investment scams.

Banking Scams

Popular banking scams include:

  • Fake check scams, where a scam artist creates counterfeit checks that look legitimate, with watermarks, routing numbers, and the names of real financial institutions. They then try to deposit them in banks, use them as part of other frauds against consumers, or use them to pay companies for products or services. 
  • Unsolicited check fraud, where a scammer may send you a check that you didn't have a legitimate reason to receive. Unfortunately, if you cash it, you may be authorizing the purchase of items you didn't ask for, signing up for a loan, or something else you didn't ask for. The Federal Trade Commission offers tips to help you avoid being a victim of these scams, and recommends what to do if you have been a victim.
  • Automatic withdrawals. A company sets up automatic withdrawals from your account that you didn’t approve.
  • Phishing. Email messages that ask you to verify your bank account number or debit card PIN. By clicking on the link or replying to the email with your account number, you are giving a scammer access to your financial accounts. 

Investment Scams

Investment scams prey on your hope to earn interest or a return on investment on the amount of money that you invest. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) offers overviews of many common investment frauds, and tips to avoid being a victim.

If you are the victim of an investment fraud, you can file a complaint with the SEC or with your state's securities administrator.

For more information and how to report Scams and Financial Fraud you can visit usa.gov.

Financial Literacy Resources

To educate yourself as well as others about financial literacy, you can click here to visit NCUA’s Financial Literacy Resources page. The website includes educational resources for children and adults, explaining how to save and budget as well as articles and games that will explain how to make financially responsible decisions.

To learn how to manage and grow your money, visit mymoney.gov. Here you will learn about the five My Money principles that will help you with your everyday financial decisions.